Blogging Etiquette: A Brief List

Blogging is a whole new ballpark. It’s been around a while, but many new to it don’t know where to start. I hop this brief list of helpful tips will set you on the right path!

  1. Don’t blog everything. Save some material for your personal life.
  2. Don’t blog everything. People may be offended or insulted by what you find hurtful or candid.
  3. Go out and explore the world. You have to draw inspiration from somewhere (unless you’re fucking Shakespeare–no comment on the inaccuracy of that analogy). Whether that means cavorting about your living room or traveling to the opposite [sic.] of the globe, you know what is adventure to you.
  4. Don’t PM people in the comments section! This is the blogosphere, not social media. At best, what you should do is a “shoutout” getting your recipient’s attention publicly on your blog. This is open for everyone to read, and everyone will know who you’re talking to IF you address them by name. You also have the option of a “they’ll know who they are” with no direct name addressed.
  5. Use tags or categories. The internet is a desert–really, it’s impossible to find anyone. Do your future friends a favor and help them find their way to your home.
  6. Don’t be intimidated and feel you have to put pictures on your blog! Sure, WordPress recommends it, and you need it to get featured (so by all means if that’s your goal, go ahead!), but just don’t get any gray hairs over it is what I’m saying.
  7. I once heard that to be a successful blogger, for every post you create, you should read 9 others (from other bloggers). Something like that. Well, that may be true, that may not be, but networking is certainly a part of blogging (unless you really want people to go on a treasure hunt to find you!). What I wanted to add as addenda to this recommendation is: Re-reading your own posts counts!–self-analysis and constructive criticism of your own writing will help you grow as a writer; you shouldn’t feel pressured to read things you don’t find pleasant just to network; everyone has a different goal for their blog and not everyone is in it to get popular, so if  you think your time is more valuable focusing on your own writing, by all means, spend it that way!
  8. Don’t be afraid to be candid, but do be aware of your own right to privacy! People can learn an awful lot about you as a person and citizen if you’re not careful with your information and voice. Plus, see point 2 above–TMI is still a thing.
  9. Consider your audience. Writing posts for particular people without naming them can be inspiring on both ends. Writing posts inspired by other posts can compound wealth. Writing to a specific audience (and tagging/categorizing correctly to attract that audience) can be rewarding if that’s the audience you feel you belong with.
  10. Just have fun! This one, though at first glance either cheesy or straightforward or superficial, can actually be the toughest to pull off. Not everyone has a perfect life, and anxiety, paranoia, and fear can set in when you’re about to spill your guts or artistic side or personal passions to strangers on the internet. Be mindful of your rights (whatever those may be in the government you are ruled under (hopefully you have some…)), and remember that being an ass can come back and bite you back in the end. Misunderstandings do happen, and I have seen my fair share of open apologies on the blogosphere, so it’s not always life-and-death. But don’t let it get there in the first place! For example, us in the states are guaranteed by our Constitution the right to freedom of the press. Don’t we feel powerful now! But there is a line that can be crossed, and that line is called “extremism” or “terrorism”. You’ll know it when you get to know it. (Wow this one went on longer than I thought it would… see how complicated having fun is?)

I hope that helps. Welcome to the blogosphere!